PEARSON PLC ORD 25P  PSON.L 
$1,026.00  $0.5  0.05%  
DIAGEO PLC ORD 28 101/108P  DGE.L 
$2,496.50  $0.5  0.02%  
RECKITT BENCKISER GROUP PLC ORD  RKT.L 
$4,493.00  $85.00  1.93%  
LLOYDS BANKING GROUP PLC ORD 10  LLOY.L 
$59.66  $0.14  0.24%  
MELROSE INDUSTRIES PLC ORD GBP0  MRO.L 
$556.20  $6.80  1.21%  
FRESNILLO PLC ORD USD0.50  FRES.L 
$607.00  $7.00  1.17%  
NATWEST GROUP PLC ORD 107.69P  NWG.L 
$337.50  $2.50  0.74%  
WEIR GROUP PLC ORD 12.5P  WEIR.L 
$1,913.00  $2.00  0.10%  
STANDARD CHARTERED PLC ORD USD0  STAN.L 
$721.40  $3.20  0.44%  
ENDEAVOUR MINING PLC ORD USD0.0  EDV.L 
$1,806.00  $70.00  4.03%  
OCADO GROUP PLC ORD 2P  OCDO.L 
$411.10  $19.70  4.57%  
ANGLO AMERICAN PLC ORD USD0.549  AAL.L 
$2,222.00  $37.50  1.72%  
ASHTEAD GROUP PLC ORD 10P  AHT.L 
$5,242.00  $56.00  1.06%  
SEGRO PLC ORD 10P  SGRO.L 
$901.20  $4.20  0.46%  
BAE SYSTEMS PLC ORD 2.5P  BA.L 
$1,259.50  $12.50  0.98%  
VODAFONE GROUP PLC ORD USD0.20   VOD.L 
$70.44  $0.14  0.20%  
HSBC HOLDINGS PLC ORD $0.50 (UK  HSBA.L 
$663.00  $3.10  0.47%  
GLENCORE PLC ORD USD0.01  GLEN.L 
$433.35  $0.05  0.01%  
ROLLS-ROYCE HOLDINGS PLC ORD SH  RR.L 
$443.90  $16.10  3.50%  
UNITE GROUP PLC ORD 25P  UTG.L 
$922.00  $2.00  0.22%  
ANTOFAGASTA PLC ORD 5P  ANTO.L 
$1,946.00  $33.00  1.73%  
CRODA INTERNATIONAL PLC ORD 10.  CRDA.L 
$4,059.00  $4.00  0.10%  
KINGFISHER PLC ORD 15 5/7P  KGF.L 
$277.50  $0.4  0.14%  
SPIRAX GROUP PLC ORD 26 12/13P  SPX.L 
$8,630.00  $20.00  0.23%  
TAYLOR WIMPEY PLC ORD 1P  TW.L 
$156.60  $0.6  0.38%  
WPP PLC ORD 10P  WPP.L 
$741.40  $8.80  1.17%  
RIO TINTO PLC ORD 10P  RIO.L 
$4,937.50  $65.50  1.34%  
HOWDEN JOINERY GROUP PLC ORD 10  HWDN.L 
$947.50  $12.50  1.34%  
MONDI PLC ORD EUR 0.22  MNDI.L 
$1,554.00  $19.50  1.24%  
HARGREAVES LANSDOWN PLC ORD 0.4  HL.L 
$1,096.00  $9.00  0.81%  
BARRATT DEVELOPMENTS PLC ORD 10  BDEV.L 
$506.60  $11.00  2.22%  

The Failure of the G-20 “Common Framework” for Debt Relief

by Rahil M
0 comment

A major chunk of the world is facing a significant debt crisis, especially in low-income countries, where governments are finding it difficult to manage unsustainable debt burdens amidst economic challenges, further exacerbated by the pandemic. Despite efforts to address these issues through initiatives like the Common Framework, progress towards providing relief has been slow, hampered by various complexities and disagreements among stakeholders.

Understanding the Debt Problem

At the end of 2022, the debt owed by the 75 poorest nations had surged to $1.1 trillion, more than double the level in 2012. This increase in debt was due to the need for countries to bolster their healthcare systems and provide economic support during the pandemic. However, rising interest rates and other economic pressures, including inflationary spikes caused by events like Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, have further strained the financial capacity of these nations. As a result, countries such as Zambia, Sri Lanka, and Ghana have already defaulted on their loans, while others, including Lebanon and Argentina, are in debt distress.

The Common Framework – What is it?

As an answer to the rising debt crisis, the G20 and the Paris Club developed the Common Framework, aiming to coordinate debt restructuring efforts among diverse creditors, including traditional lenders and emerging players like China. This initiative marked a significant step forward in addressing the complexities of sovereign debt restructuring by bringing together a wide range of stakeholders.

The Process of Restructuring

The Common Framework outlines a multi-stage process for countries seeking debt relief. Firstly, governments must work with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to develop sustainable borrowing plans tailored to their economic circumstances. These plans typically involve measures to rein in spending, increase revenue collection, and secure debt relief. Once approved by the IMF, countries engage in negotiations with an official committee comprising representatives from their creditor nations to reach agreements on restructuring terms. These terms may include debt write-offs, extensions, or reduced servicing costs. More importantly, countries are required to seek comparable relief from their private creditors to ensure equitable treatment across all lenders

Countries Using the Framework

While the Common Framework offers a promising path to debt relief, progress has been very slow, with only a few countries actively making use of the mechanism. As of March 2024, Chad, Zambia, Ethiopia, and Ghana are among the few nations that have applied for relief. Zambia’s recent agreement on Eurobonds, following three years of negotiations, serves as a notable example of progress under the framework. However, challenges persist, especially regarding the equal treatment of all creditors, as highlighted by the rejection of an earlier deal by official creditors.

Challenges

The execution of the Common Framework has been hindered by various challenges, including disagreements between traditional creditors and emerging lenders like China. Differences in opinion regarding the handling of debt restructuring, the inclusion of local-currency debt in deals, and the burden-sharing among creditors have complicated negotiations. For instance, China’s lending practices, particularly through initiatives like the Belt and Road, differ from those of traditional lenders, posing unique challenges in reaching consensus.

China’s Role

China’s rise as a major international creditor has highly influenced the dynamics of sovereign debt restructuring. Ever since the launch of the Belt and Road initiative in 2013, China has been dominating as the world’s largest bilateral creditor to developing and emerging nations, committing billions of dollars in funding. However, the absence of transparency regarding the extent of China’s lending and differences in lending priorities compared to traditional lenders have added complexity to debt negotiations

Streamlining the Process

Recognizing the need for more effective debt restructuring mechanisms, stakeholders, including the IMF and G20 nations, are working on new guidelines to streamline the process. These efforts include setting timelines for debt restructuring, defining eligible debt types, and involving private creditors earlier in the process to enhance transparency and efficiency.

You may also like

Leave a Comment

Subscribe to Our Newsletters

We are a UK-based business awards firm that specializes in recognizing and celebrating exceptional achievements across various sectors. Our team of experts is dedicated to delivering world-class services, including event management, judging, and award design. With a focus on quality and excellence, we aim to showcase the best of international businesses and inspire future success.

Contact us: [email protected]

© 2022 – The Business Pinnacle. All Right Reserved. Developed by Aapta

The Business Pinnacle