PEARSON PLC ORD 25P  PSON.L 
$1,027.00  $1.0000  0.10%  
DIAGEO PLC ORD 28 101/108P  DGE.L 
$2,514.50  $18.00  0.72%  
RECKITT BENCKISER GROUP PLC ORD  RKT.L 
$4,426.00  $67.00  1.49%  
LLOYDS BANKING GROUP PLC ORD 10  LLOY.L 
$58.98  $0.68  1.14%  
MELROSE INDUSTRIES PLC ORD GBP0  MRO.L 
$548.80  $7.40  1.33%  
FRESNILLO PLC ORD USD0.50  FRES.L 
$586.00  $21.00  3.46%  
NATWEST GROUP PLC ORD 107.69P  NWG.L 
$331.50  $6.00  1.78%  
WEIR GROUP PLC ORD 12.5P  WEIR.L 
$1,862.00  $51.00  2.67%  
STANDARD CHARTERED PLC ORD USD0  STAN.L 
$703.00  $18.40  2.55%  
ENDEAVOUR MINING PLC ORD USD0.0  EDV.L 
$1,735.00  $71.00  3.93%  
OCADO GROUP PLC ORD 2P  OCDO.L 
$413.10  $2.00  0.49%  
ANGLO AMERICAN PLC ORD USD0.549  AAL.L 
$2,207.50  $14.50  0.65%  
ASHTEAD GROUP PLC ORD 10P  AHT.L 
$5,090.00  $152.00  2.90%  
SEGRO PLC ORD 10P  SGRO.L 
$891.60  $9.60  1.07%  
BAE SYSTEMS PLC ORD 2.5P  BA.L 
$1,233.50  $26.00  2.06%  
VODAFONE GROUP PLC ORD USD0.20   VOD.L 
$69.30  $1.14  1.62%  
HSBC HOLDINGS PLC ORD $0.50 (UK  HSBA.L 
$651.90  $11.10  1.67%  
GLENCORE PLC ORD USD0.01  GLEN.L 
$424.30  $9.05  2.09%  
ROLLS-ROYCE HOLDINGS PLC ORD SH  RR.L 
$431.50  $12.40  2.79%  
UNITE GROUP PLC ORD 25P  UTG.L 
$910.00  $12.00  1.30%  
ANTOFAGASTA PLC ORD 5P  ANTO.L 
$1,896.50  $49.50  2.54%  
CRODA INTERNATIONAL PLC ORD 10.  CRDA.L 
$3,997.00  $62.00  1.53%  
KINGFISHER PLC ORD 15 5/7P  KGF.L 
$271.44  $6.06  2.18%  
SPIRAX GROUP PLC ORD 26 12/13P  SPX.L 
$8,535.00  $95.00  1.10%  
TAYLOR WIMPEY PLC ORD 1P  TW.L 
$153.15  $3.45  2.20%  
WPP PLC ORD 10P  WPP.L 
$717.40  $24.00  3.24%  
RIO TINTO PLC ORD 10P  RIO.L 
$4,884.50  $53.00  1.07%  
HOWDEN JOINERY GROUP PLC ORD 10  HWDN.L 
$907.00  $40.50  4.27%  
MONDI PLC ORD EUR 0.22  MNDI.L 
$1,537.00  $17.00  1.09%  
HARGREAVES LANSDOWN PLC ORD 0.4  HL.L 
$1,089.50  $6.50  0.59%  
BARRATT DEVELOPMENTS PLC ORD 10  BDEV.L 
$500.00  $6.60  1.30%  

Saudi Arabia Emerges as Lone Bidder for 2034 World Cup: FIFA Faces Human Rights Concerns

by Rahil M
0 comment

Amnesty International calls for clear human rights commitments as Saudi Arabia emerges as sole bidder for the 2034 FIFA World Cup

FIFA’s announcement that Saudi Arabia is the sole bidder for the 2034 men’s World Cup has raised concerns regarding the organization’s ability to uphold human rights commitments in hosting the tournament.

After Australia declined to submit a bid within the unexpectedly short 25-day window provided by FIFA, the likelihood of a second World Cup taking place in the Gulf region within 12 years seems almost inevitable. However, the lack of a competitive bidding process and the swiftness with which the selection process was executed have sparked alarm among human rights groups, with Amnesty International urging FIFA to reconsider if human rights commitments are not adhered to.

Steve Cockburn, Head of Economic and Social Justice at Amnesty International, stated, “Human rights commitments must be agreed with potential hosts before final decisions on holding the tournaments are made. FIFA must now make it clear how hosts are expected to comply with its human rights policies. It must also be prepared to halt the bidding process if serious human rights risks are not credibly addressed.”

According to FIFA’s bidding process for the 2030 and 2034 men’s World Cup finals, host countries are expected to align with the terms of the United Nations’ Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. This entails the implementation of “human rights and labour standards” by bidding member associations, governments, and other entities involved in organizing the tournament, including those overseeing stadium construction, training sites, hotels, and airports.

Countries interested in hosting the World Cup are required to disclose potential human rights risks that might hinder them from complying with the UN guidelines. FIFA commits to “constructively engage with relevant authorities and other stakeholders and make every effort to uphold its international human rights responsibilities.”

The Sports and Rights Alliance, a coalition of human rights organizations, emphasizes that the absence of competitive bids diminishes FIFA’s leverage in enforcing necessary changes. Minky Worden, Director of Global Initiatives at Human Rights Watch, called on FIFA to rigorously enforce its stated principles.

“FIFA’s human rights policy must not be reduced to a paper exercise when it comes to choosing the host of the world’s most-watched sporting event,” Worden emphasized. Given the vast scale of the World Cup, there are substantial human rights concerns to be considered in all host bids, offering opportunities for positive change that should not be overlooked.

While the 2022 FIFA World Cup was held in Qatar during the winter months to avoid extreme heat, Saudi Arabia’s plans for the tournament’s timing remain uncertain. Some of the country’s cooler hilltop cities may provide flexibility, but major cities like Riyadh and Jeddah frequently experience sweltering temperatures of 40°C (104°F) in July and August.

Unlike Qatar, which had to embark on stadium construction from scratch, Saudi Arabia has already outlined plans for several new stadiums as it prepares to host the AFC Football Asian Cup in 2027. The country must have a minimum of 14 stadiums with a seating capacity exceeding 40,000. Presently, only two stadiums meet this criterion.

Saudi Arabia, as stated by state media, “intends to deliver a world-class tournament and will draw inspiration from Saudi Arabia’s ongoing social and economic transformation.” The kingdom, under the leadership of Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, is investing significantly in new cities, tourism resorts, and electric vehicle manufacturing to reduce its reliance on oil. Sports play a vital role in this transformation, with Saudi Arabia hosting events such as Formula One races, boxing matches, and the Dakar Rally in recent years. Additionally, the country has made substantial investments in football, securing high-profile signings such as Brazil’s Neymar, France’s Karim Benzema, and Portuguese superstar Cristiano Ronaldo through its clubs.

Critics have accused Saudi Arabia of “sports-washing” its image and human rights record through these events. In a recent Fox News interview, the Crown Prince emphasized that sports investments are primarily intended to boost the country’s economy.

Saudi Arabia has until July 2024 to submit its full bid, with FIFA set to publish its assessments at the end of the following year before a final vote at its Congress. With FIFA having previously struggled to secure binding commitments on human rights when awarding the World Cup to Qatar in 2010, measures implemented under Gianni Infantino’s presidency since 2016 aimed to address the issue but have had limited effect. Reports of labour exploitation and rights violations have persisted during the preparations for the tournament.

Similar to Qatar, homosexuality is illegal in Saudi Arabia. Leading sports rights activist and Chair of the Fare network, Lou Englefield called on FIFA and Saudi authorities to address the safety and well-being of LGBTIQ+ individuals at the 2034 tournament.

“It is crucial that the men’s World Cup is shared worldwide, as it is a fundamental part of developing football and promoting it as an agent for social change,” Engelfield stated. “After the concerns raised at the Qatar World Cup less than a year ago, where LGBTIQ+ people faced marginalization and dismissal of their concerns, we seek assurances of a different approach from the Saudi authorities. The men’s World Cup should be a platform for inclusion, and we will be seeking opportunities for dialogue as soon as possible.”

You may also like

Leave a Comment

Subscribe to Our Newsletters

We are a UK-based business awards firm that specializes in recognizing and celebrating exceptional achievements across various sectors. Our team of experts is dedicated to delivering world-class services, including event management, judging, and award design. With a focus on quality and excellence, we aim to showcase the best of international businesses and inspire future success.

Contact us: [email protected]

© 2022 – The Business Pinnacle. All Right Reserved. Developed by Aapta

The Business Pinnacle